A Greek-English Lexicon ↑ Alcman, fragment 83. In gratitude, Phrixus gave the king the golden fleece of the ram, which Aeetes hung in a tree in his kingdom. The story of Ino, Athamas and Melicertes is relevant also in the context of two larger themes, Ino, daughter of Cadmus and Harmonia, had an end just as tragic as her siblings: Semele died while pregnant with Zeus' child, killed by her own pride and lack of trust in her lover; Agave killed her own son, King Pentheus, while struck with Dionysian madness, and Actaeon, son of Autonoe, the third sibling, was torn apart by his own hunting dogs. In Greek mythology Ino ([pronunciation? Both were afterwards worshipped as marine divinities, Ino as Leucothea ("the white goddess"), Melicertes as Palaemon. Homer calls her "Ino-Leocothea of the beautiful ankles [καλλίσφυρος], daughter of Cadmus, who was once a mortal speaking with the tongue of men, but now in the salt sea-waters has received honor at the hands of the gods". Helle fell off the ram into the Hellespont (which was named after her, meaning Sea of Helle) and drowned, but Phrixus survived all the way to Colchis, where King Aeetes took him in and treated him kindly, giving Phrixus his daughter, Chalciope, in marriage. She and her husband Athamas incurred the wrath of Hera when they fostered the infant god Dionysos. 975f). We have sent our Data Dwarves off to find more nuggets of information. Alcman called her "Queen of the Sea" (θαλασσομέδουσα), which, if not hyperbole, would make her a doublet of Amphitrite. When Athamas returned to his second wife, Ino, Themisto (his third wife) sought revenge by dressing her children in white clothing and Ino's in black and directing the murder of the children in black. eo:Inoa Ino switched their clothes without Themisto knowing and she killed her own children. In Greek mythology Ino (Template:Lang-el) was a mortal queen of Thebes, who after her death and transfiguration was worshiped as a goddess under her epithet Leucothea, the "white goddess." In Greek mythology Ino (/ˈaɪnoʊ/ Greek: Ἰνώ Ancient: [iːnɔ̌ː][1]) was a mortal queen of Thebes, who after her death and transfiguration was worshiped as a goddess under her epithet Leucothea, the "white goddess." When he returned to Ino, he caused Themisto's jealousy, who devised a plot to kill Ino's children. In Greek mythology Ino (Template:Lang-el) was a mortal queen of Thebes, who after her death and transfiguration was worshiped as a goddess under her epithet Leucothea, the "white goddess." ru:Ино None can escape the powers of Dionysus, the god of wine. Athamas reluctantly agreed. She was the second wife of King Athamas, with whom she had two children, Learches and Melicertes. Do we sell Ino graphic novels, books, video or role-playing games (RPG)? [4] The local farmers, frightened of famine, asked a nearby oracle for assistance. https://mythology.wikia.org/wiki/Ino?oldid=107834. nl:Ino (mythologie) Athamas, in Greek mythology, king of the prehistoric Minyans in the ancient Boeotian city of Orchomenus.His first wife was Nephele, a cloud goddess. If you wish to use our material in your essay, book, article, website or project, please consult our permissions page. Ino switched their clothes without Themisto knowing and she killed her own children. As punishment the goddess drove Athamas into a murderous rage and he slew his eldest child. She was once a mortal princess named Ino, a daughter of King Cadmus of Thebes. Daughter of Cadmus and Harmonia, she came to a tragic end. Each of the sons of Aeolus would come to rule their own kingdoms, and in the case of Athamas, his kingdom was that of Orchomenus in Boeotia. See Athamas for the full sordid story. She was the wife of Athamas , to whom she bore Learchus and Melicertes. Local tradition sited the suckling of Dionysus at Brasiai in. Copyright © 1999-2020 Godchecker, Inc. All rights reserved. et:Ino Both were afterwards worshipped as marine divinities, Ino as Leucothea ("the white goddess"), Melicertes as Palaemon. Helle fell off the ram into the Hellespont (which was named after her, meaning Sea of Helle) and drowned, but Phrixus survived all the way to Colchis, where King Aeetes took him in and treated him kindly, giving Phrixus his daughter, Chalciope, in marriage. From Infogalactic: the planetary knowledge core, Local tradition sited the suckling of Dionysus at Brasiai in, Henry George Liddell. Robert Scott. Ino hatched a devious plot to get rid of the twins, roasting all the crop seeds of Boeotia so they would not grow. ]; Greek: Ἰνώ) was a mortal queen of Thebes, who after her death and transfiguration was worshiped as a goddess under her epithet Leucothea, the "white goddess." Take your favorite fandoms with you and never miss a beat. Before he was killed though, Phrixus and Helle were rescued by a flying golden ram sent by Nephele, their natural mother. In her mortal self, Ino, the second wife of the Minyan king Athamas, the mother of Learches and Melicertes, daughter of Cadmus and Harmonia[3] and stepmother of Phrixus and Helle, was one of the three sisters of Semele, the mortal woman of the house of Cadmus who gave birth to Dionysus. Phrixus survived the flight and reached Colchis, where the king Aeetes welcomed him; Phrixus, grateful for the hospitality, gave the golden fleece of the ram as a gift to the king, which would later be the object of desire for Jason and the Argonauts. Godchecker guide to Ino, the Greek legendary mortal from Greek mythology. Robert Scott. Robert Scott. Please mention Godchecker.com when praying to the Gods. A Greek-English Lexicon, https://infogalactic.com/w/index.php?title=Ino_(Greek_mythology)&oldid=51415, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, About Infogalactic: the planetary knowledge core. Helle fell off the ram into the Hellespont (which was named after her, meaning Sea of Helle) and drowned, but Phrixus survived all the way to Colchis, where King Aeetes took him in and treated him kindly, giving Phrixus his daughter, Chalciope, in marriage. Before he was killed though, Phrixus and Helle were rescued by a flying golden ram sent by Nephele, their natural mother. Athamas reluctantly agreed. Maenads were reputed to tear their own children limb from limb in their madness. Later, Ino raised Dionysus, her nephew, son of her sister Semele,[4] causing Hera's intense jealousy. Athamas regained his sanity and fled, and later married Themisto with whom he had a number of children. Examples: JUPITER, JUP, JUPI. In her mortal self, Ino, the second wife of the Minyan king Athamas, the mother of Learches and Melicertes, daughter of Cadmus and Harmonia[2] and stepmother of Phrixus and Helle, was one of the three sisters of Semele, the mortal woman of the house of Cadmus who gave birth to Dionysus.

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